Feb 01

Caught between learning and performance mindsets, Huffman et al. reveal that residents “front stage” a performance based mindset based on perceptions of formal assessment and their relationship with supervisors.

 

Read the accompanying article to this podcast: Resident impression management within feedback conversations: A qualitative study.

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Feb 01

Cornett et al. use realist review to examine how scholarly experiences can act as a means to develop in‐depth knowledge and research skills while supporting research outputs and future research interests.

 

Read the accompanying article to this podcast: A realist review of scholarly experiences in medical education.

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Jan 15

Moving beyond simplistic solutions, Gordon and Cleland highlight the value of organisational theories for unlocking the complexity of change in medical education.

Read the accompanying article to this audio paper: Change is never easy: How management theories can help operationalise change in medical education.

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Jan 15

The authors turn to Deming for a #QI framework to support continuous improvement of #MedEd practice and scholarship.

Read the accompanying article to this audio paper: Application of continuous quality improvement to medical education

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Jan 01

van der Niet & Bleakley examine ambiguous and ethically problematic effects of Artificial Intelligence for medical education, including shifting practice towards objectification of patients.

Read the accompanying article to this podcast: Where medical education meets artificial intelligence: ‘Does technology care?’.

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Jan 01

Shaky conceptual foundations, over‐reliance on objectivism, and use of a "disease model" have led to excess focus on solutions & loss of opportunities for resilience development in our struggle with impaired wellness.

Read the accompanying article to this podcast: Why impaired wellness may be inevitable in medicine, and why that may not be a bad thing.

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Dec 21

To help educators identify cognitively overloaded trainees, Sewell et al. characterize four different indicators of overload that manifest in the HPE workplace.

Read the accompanying article to this audio paper: How do attending physicians describe cognitive overload among their workplace learners?

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Dec 21

While critically important, intraprofessional collaboration is not learnt spontaneously. Improvements in mindset, professional identity and power dynamics are crucial to its promotion.

Read the accompanying article to this audio paper: Chances for learning intraprofessional collaboration between residents in hospitals.

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Dec 01

Judgments about what is useful #evaluation create boundaries for evaluation’s impact on #HPE #MedEd. Onyura outlines this argument by examining how utilization priorities influence evaluation scope and quality. Read the accompanying article to this podcast: Useful to whom? Evaluation utilisation theory and boundaries for programme evaluation scope - Onyura - 2020 - Medical Education - Wiley Online Library

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Dec 01

How do trainees distinguish and navigate their learning trajectories? Brydges et al. use self‐regulated learning theory to identify how invasive procedures are learned at the bedside. Read the accompanying article to this podcast: Resident learning trajectories in the workplace: A self‐regulated learning analysis - Brydges - 2020 - Medical Education - Wiley Online Library

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